The Art of Noise:The lost broadcast – (radio performance)


Live recording of class performing with radio receivers. Performed by

James Sanders, Samuel Quineros, William Bullock, Marnei Shanahan, Henry Burrows,

Hamis Stephenson, Simon Polson, Russell Phillips, Yeung Chung Mok (Andy),

Luke O Donnell, Nicola Coady, Sarah Humphrey, Anne Eglit, Jana Hawkins-Andersen,

Maiko Hina, Seraya Harding, Georgia Drew, Milica Gilgorevic, Rachel Jolly, Celeste Gubb,

Nina Buchanna, Joshua Hgkerr, Emma Varker and David Haines.

Studio Theory Week 2: Camera Lucida

A nice article on the book by Roland Barthes here.

“A concept is a brick. It can be used to build a courthouse of reason. Or it can be thrown through the window.”
― Gilles Deleuze, Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia

Where is the studium here in the first image ?…and yet its  full of points, punctuation and punctum. And in the one below, many punctum – but where has the studium gone or is  there in some of the tiles,  reinsertion of another kind of punctum, namely time? I wonder does time act as a more diffuse entity than the points of the first punctum that Barthes identifies – perhaps its not a punctum at all, ( this second punctum) perhaps its a kind of time fog that sits just below the surface, or more curiously, is simply waiting to seep out towards (frame dependence) and there is a third kind one of recognition…hold on the modes are extending…barthes gives us some, but how many are there exactly ? Could there be twelve or twenty five ? Can you find others, is there not a whole taxonomy to be discovered in this new ontology of  photography ? What about the wya the image distorts or decenters space by changing how we see scale ??? etc are there others ?

ART OF NOISE Week 1

The Art of Noise unit will engage a studio-based approach to the production of sound art works. The emphasis will be on the production of sound objects, sound sculpture, sound installation, performance and new ways of working with sound. The unit will begin with the physicality of sound and music physics as a starting point, listening to sonic phenomena, materials, forms and existing sound works. This unit will be conducted across various studios in an open studio framework working within a variety of workshops, sound studios and digital labs.
The Art of Noise works with experimental sound under the broadest terms, as sound crosses barriers through physical and cultural space. This unit explores the potential of new sonic sculptures, instruments and installations that cover a plethora of approaches to sound. This open studio investigates sound as a force in the world.

Artists Statement

Orgasm

The title says it all and we have almost nothing to say about it. Finally we can leave all of our words behind by choosing to embrace this singularity common to everyone. Everything from this point on in this work shall be over-loaded. We give to you pulsating fields of dust and matter, earth and sky, sun and moon and two devices that are said to be able to restore balance back in to the local environment. We also give you the sound of protean noise from which the ecstatic lightning bolt shatters the swarm, into the Z of creation.

Haines & Hinterding- 2012

Remarks for copy

Haines and Hinterding, in their new work “Orgasm” explore one of the most fundamental experiences in a stridently non-literal way. This most private of acts common to everyone and yet inexpressible is at the same time over-coded by a total excess of images, expressions and meanings. In a world of endless mediations and translations what could signal more effectively a kind of wasteland of empty gestures and little deaths at the same time as belonging to the most intensely profound form of pleasure.

The artists see in this complicated nexus, an opportunity to experiment with such a ‘loaded subject’ in another way. They want to try to somehow go into the dark interior of this singularity, in order to try to uncover its fields and vibrations. For them the meaning of this exploration is to try to uncover a plane of expression that exemplifies creatively, the life of this impulse in a flash of energy release.

In earlier works, they have created odes to a maverick psychoanalyst, Wilhelm Reich (student of Freud) who introduced to the world the unlikely combination of orgasm therapy and ‘orgone energy’ an unproven cosmic force. Reich’s discovery included the invention of devices that are said to be able to harness and manipulate this energy, in order to restore balance back into natural systems such as the human body or clouds. Two of these devices, known as ‘Cloudbusters,’appear in this exhibition, faithfully built to the original design, they are said to be able to blast holes in clouds and restore balance back into the local meteorological environment and notably, Reich used these devices to fight extra-terrestrials in the 1950s.

Evernote:Cats away! Artist turns his dead pet into flying helicopter after it is killed by a car | Mail Online

From Evernote:

Cats away! Artist turns his dead pet into flying helicopter after it is killed by a car | Mail Online

Clipped from: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2154283/Cats-away-Artist-turns-dead-pet-flying-helicopter-killed-car.html

Cats away! Artist turns his dead pet into flying helicopter after it is killed by a car

By Suzannah Hills

PUBLISHED:

01:32 GMT, 4 June 2012

| UPDATED:

07:26 GMT, 4 June 2012

Many animal lovers find it hard to part with their pets when they die.

So when cat Orville, named after the famous aviator Orville Wright, was run over by a car, his artist owner decided to turn him into a permanent piece of artwork as the ultimate tribute by transforming him into a flying helicopter.

Dutch artist Bart Jansen first stuffed Orville before teaming up with radio control helicopter flyer Arjen Beltman to build a specially-designed flying mechanism to attach to the cat.

Scroll down for video

Paws for thought: Cat Orville was turned into a helicopter by his artist owner Bart Jansen, pictured right,after he was run over by a car

Flying high: Bart Jensen has dubbed his cat art The Orvillecopter

Cat overhead: Radio control helicopter flyer Arjen Beltman, pictured back right, controls The Orvillecopter

The end result, named the Orvillecopter, is now on show at the Kunstrai art festival in Amsterdam where visitors can watch Orville flying for themselves.

More…

Jansen said the Orvillecopter is ‘half cat, half machine’, and part of a visual art project to pay tribute to his cat Orville.

Jansen, part of the art cooperative Generaal Pardon, said: ‘After a period of mourning he received his propellers posthumously.’

He added that Orville will soon be ‘flying with the birds’ stating: ‘Oh how he loved birds. He will receive more powerful engines and larger props for his birthday. So this hopping will soon change into steady flight.’

Moving art: The Orvillecopter is on display in a gallery during at the Kunstrai art festival in Amsterdam

Tribute: Dutch artist Bart Jansen made the The Orvillecopter as part of a visual art project to pay tribute to his cat Orville

Putting on the finishing touches: Bart Jansen, left, made the cat contraption with radio control helicopter flyer Arjen Beltman, pictured right

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I don’t remember this in 101 Things to do with a Dead Cat.

– Chris, Tyne and Wear, UK, 04/6/2012 10:11

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As a pet owner i find this absolutley disgusting the poor cat should be laid to r.i.p, this is not art just idiotic behaviour.

– amy, banbury, 04/6/2012 10:09

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It has given me an idea, a cat candle holder, I could do with one..

– Ian , Southport, 04/6/2012 10:09

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It has given me an idea, a cat candle holder, I could do with one..

– Ian , Southport, 04/6/2012 10:09

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no person who loved their pet would do something so hideous to it

– angela , bolton,uk, 04/6/2012 09:59

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I wonder if his girlfriend dies, he is also going to mummify her? SICK

– Carlota, Austria, 04/6/2012 09:59

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Complete and utter disregard for life. What are humans coming to?

– Andrea, London, 04/6/2012 09:59

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….. 101 uses for a dead cat

– Gazza, Preston, 04/6/2012 09:56

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A tribute? More like disrespectful and sick if you ask me…….

– Nadira, Lanaken, Belgium, 04/6/2012 09:55

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Whilst I don’t like what he did I find some of the comments on here very mawkish, The cat had died, he didn’t harm it and one contributor on here happily states that although some of his pets had died, he’d had many more ‘euthanised’. For euthanised read ‘legally killed when they became a costly nuisance’ so who’s the more cruel and heartless

– Bill, Wasp in the South, 04/6/2012 09:52

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Experimental writing week 9 of blood and genitals

Self Portrait in Scent

Sketch#1

Clara Ursitti

Propionic acid

Butyric acid

Iso-valeric acid

Heptatonic acid

2-methyl acetonic acid

Putresine

Trymethyle amine

Heptane thiol

Carbon disulphite

Marcapto ethanol

Iso-eugenol

Acetones

Androstene dienone

Skatole      (1994)[1]

Clara Ursitti’s  Self Portrait in Sketch: Sketch #1 1994 made  in collaboration with Dr George Dodd articulates her own identity from a combination of “state of the art scientific odour analysis” in combination with the knowledgeable nose of her scientific collaborator. Clara Ursitti uses of the word sketch in the title precisely because she acknowledges that the task of surveillance of her body odour might extend to hundreds of chemicals. Ursitti’s self-portrait links sent with identity. It would be an interesting exercise to make qualitative evaluations of each of the aroma molecules in her smell poem. There isn’t space here to do this exercise in any detail but what one can say about the list, is that the smell of these chemicals undiluted would likely be a very unpleasant experience indeed.


[1] From The Smell culture Reader pg. 357

“Now we will see how you are with the blood” was the first thing he said. He had on a pair of round, gold rimmed “speigals.”  A thin line of red paint and congealed blood between the  rims and the lenses aroused my curiosity about what we where getting ourselves into. Flecks of red paint on his gold watch also caught my eye. He wore a hat, a vest and a black jacket. He looked like a character that had come to life out of Proust. I jumped up onto the back of the open tray truck filled with white plastic drums. One of the plastic drums touched my leg as I picked it up. I could feel warmth through plastic. In my minds eye, I remember a slow motion movie of cows falling, percussive thumps, big brown eyes becoming cloudy, the blood somehow magically ending up in these buckets. We lifted the white plastic 40 Ltr pails down to the ground and then took them into the large wooden gallery space that floated on top of backlit green jelly like water.
Later, Nitsche was being wheeled around on a scaffold by some of the other assistants. This old world looking man, hurling buckets of blood at the wall like he was a strange artist/priest.He wore a white gown.We had spent days stretching canvasses to the wall, but Nitsche was throwing and wiping the blood, almost as soon as they went up.Unlike Jackson Pollock, Nitsche liked to mostly throw and wipe the blood with the canvasses already attached to the wall(though,he did also throw it onto floor canvass as well). The blood and bright red enamel paint, would run in thin and fat streaky columns that where strikingly beautiful,like a drip landscape, the blood would seperate into little masses of cells, tiny fillegrees of this incredible organic pigment that formed a field. I will never forget that smell.
It was interesting to be part of a process that allowed for  improvisational ju-ju within a fairly formalised compositional strategy.It seemed like a good way to work  -a methodology that produced both consistency and the nice things that come from accidental procedures; pours and splashes and sweeping actions creating an ocean wave of blood or a red blood cloud. I learnt something from this.  Everyday, the space was full up with press people. I looked up to see a frozen sheet of elongated blood heading in my direction. Milli-seconds later, I was blindsided by the stuff. The blood went smack! soaked my lower body and filled my shoe. Specks of blood splashed up onto my face.Time stopped, except for the gentle pop of the press photographers flash guns and the whir of moto-drives. Everyone gasped for a second and froze in their tracks.I caught Nitsche’s eye for a moment. He was carefully judging to see if this was going to be some kind of set back. I smiled up at him and he smiled back, he paused awhile longer, to see that things where ok, and then went back to the job. Ever the performer, he knew that how he painted the work, was as much the work as the finished thing. He named it a ” Painting Action” in a loud banner, on the outside of the building.
Late one afternoon A and myself where given the job of disposing of some leftover blood. It had been sitting around for a long time, maybe a couple of weeks. What was incredible was how the blood would congeal into this solid jelly. You could have poured it onto the ground and it would have held its shape like a sculpture. It didn’t smell like balsamic, antiseptic, plastic, anymore – it had a spikiness to it that was like a thousand pin pricks in the nose, but not like rotting meat, this was somehow a kind of pure rankness. We suddenly decided to do something very mischeivous. No one was around to see us, so we hurled the contents of the bucket overboard into the harbor. Remember, it was dusk. This is the time of day that your dog will get knocked off if he goes for a swim and everyone knows that sharks arrive in numbers at this time of the day for a feed, especially in Sydney harbor. The best bit was watching the blood form a giant black stain, just like in the movie Jaws. We watched in vain for the arrival of the circling dorsal fins.Sadly, they never came.
After six o clock, when the press had finally left to go to the pub and most of the biennale people had gone home, Nitsche had some of us put on the white gowns that appeared in the work. These then had blood poured down from the neck, forming rivers from the neck down. It was a macabre and powerful gesture. We then placed the gowns throughout the installation and they hung like religious smocks of murdered priests picked up from the floor of a Dionysian orgy.In hindsight, you can see why people might react, especially the sensationalist press who had a field day with the whole thing.
Later we added 50 or so animal brains and bouquets of yellow ? flowers to the installation.
Nitsche had real presence; I had never before met anyone like him.I guess he was the first A-List Artstar and media star that I met. Hermann had brought with him a large wooden crate of books and cd’s, records and videos. It was the videos I think, that eventually brought in the vice squad. They almost shut the whole thing down. I am not sure what they where responding too? Some of the videos showed his yearly ritual performance in Prinzendorf, Austria. It may have shown some perfectly innocuous blood sodden naked art students, but it also showed some happy people stomping grapes. The strongest image was probably of a cow being disemboweled(a dead one) Hermann was pretty much incapable of hurting anything, I would think. If my memory serves me correctly, the vice squad eventually gave everything back, after a few weeks of analysis. Hermann didn’t seem too worried about any of this. I got the impression, that every time he did one of these works, which was frequently, some sort of controversy would follow.
Hermann talked openly and extensively about his life and the people he knew, which seemed to be everyone. He was generous in the way he was interested in what we where working on, we where just finishing artschool. I remember getting the impression that his life was strangely rarefied, sheltered in some ways, protected by his lovely psychoanalyst wife and also romantically driven by his artistic vision and that came through in the way he was totally genuine about what he was doing. There was no sense of irony that I could detect. Nitsches life is elevated. And in the long hours of many a restaurant meal, a nightly ritual that seemed to go on for weeks and weeks, (at his expense, we where all very poor students) Nitsche talked about personal things, things that where real and unreal, things I could never really talk about here.

In humans the olfactory receptor cells lie in the mucous membranes at the top of the air passages on each side of the nasal septum. They occupy about a total area of 2cm, which is small compared with most other mammals. Evidence from both anatomy and embryology shows that the development of the olfactory tissue is closely linked to that of the pituitary gland which lies at the base of the brain. From the receptor cells nerves pass through the olfactory lobes at the front end of the brain direct to the basal region, the part known as the “limbic system.” This forms part of our deep seated unconscious mind, being associated with the control of emotions and sexual activity, as well as with feelings of pleasure. In evolutionary terms it is also the oldest part of the brain, providing evidence of the early and continuing importance of the sense of smell in animal behaviour. [1]

Jackson Pollack’s action painting flings the paint through space in arcs of chance, landing on the canvass, which is now on the floor instead of being supported in a horizontal position and with this approach, he is able to discern the density and the direction of the paint in his noisy paintings. The accidental shatter of Duchamp’s Large Glass is a famous example of an artist riding the aleatory. Many aspects of John Cages work in sound and music continually rely on chance operations, all realised within formal boundaries, except now, the frame of the work is duration, rather than a boundary of moulded timber.

Hermann Nitsch gets hold of Pollock’s methodology and reverses the terms by naming it “Painting Action” and instead of the brittle car duco that signs itself with the United States motor industry, paints with blood spatters. This is the animal blood of Europe and the blood of the provincial farm and of the peasant farmers and of the horrors of war and he calls on   the god Dionysius, as part of his cathartic ritual. At the same time his work belongs to the orgy of mass production, the sausage factory, the curtains of blood on the walls and floor of the abattoir, forming glorious patterns. In his ritual actions, one palpably smells the blood and one sees up close the separation of the iron of the red blood cells into brown stains of oxidation and if one is holding the bucket and it happens to touch bare skin on the leg, the warmth of blood, fresh from the kill can be felt.

The smell in the space is antiseptic and also of the animal. There is a velvety thick smell in the air that tickles the trigeminal nerve system,[1] as much as it is ringing in the olfactory epithelium. Over a six week period, as the fresh blood diminishes from it’s almost hospital like antiseptic olfactory qualities, the smell becomes even more of an irritant and metallic, as if the dust of crushed chilli and powdered aluminium has been flung into the air. In Nitsch’s work we have a situation of controlled decay, or a tonal synthesis of the cadaver, a reduction or distillation of the carcass, only a part of the animal is in the room. Missing are the strange smells of gut and faeces and secretions from the other organs.[2]Little wonder Nitsch is an artist fascinated by the drones of musical organs as much as he is by animal organs.[3]

Artists don’t have exclusive rights on harnessing chaos towards creative ends; this belongs to the entire world. Science moulds and studies chaos and so do religion and politics.  We are both grounded and free. Grounded by language and our subjectivity and yet when language escapes us, ecstasy, laughter, or humiliation takes over. When our subjectivity dissipates we are heading towards nirvana, euphoria or under threat, heading into panic stricken chaos. Could this be why aroma has been pushed aside because it couldn’t be held in check by the comfort of critical distance, nor could it be contained, by the chill of certain logics?

Let us be done for now with the ‘subject – object’ distinction and instead try to imagine ‘things’ swarming and bumping into other things. We have language and the symbolic and it gifts to us. It keeps us grounded and yet it too produces ‘ecstatic’ noises – the cries and screams of children on the beach in summer, or the cries of the crowd at the match – the angry mob. All of the cries that belong to the guttural pre-figurative sounds mixing with words, before the separation back to our houses. There is feedback between these two seemingly different worlds, a Gordian knot. [cit]

The background noise is always there, the signal claps like a flash of lightning, rumour rushes forth. The signal is a unit, pandemonium is undefined, and rumour is a plurality. The ruckus fluctuates like choppy waters lapping, the signal is a fluctuation, the rumour’s noise is the flux, or the totality of fluxions. It increases, decreases, globally, locally it is multiple, various, variegated. Voices, cries, tears, thundering’s, rumblings, whistles and crashes, breaths, blasts, grindings, blows,  chains and beats, cracklings and sounds, growling and waves, moans that die away…the river of noise carries along a thousand tonalities. “ [4]

Our senses are always adjusting to noise, responding to changes in energy; we continually come up against this fabric of noise that is ridden in everything.  Our sensory organs are transducers that convert parts of this informational spectrum into other kinds of information. How is it that any dualisms hold up when we have developed within the body such incredible systems for converting information from one type to another – information that can be so distant and information beyond language and yet is able to belong to it? Things are irreducible and yet its powers are converting as emanations and transmitting signals.


[1] Trigeminal Nerves are the second part of the smell system that makes menthol cool and chilli hot and some smells astringent.

[2]  I worked with Hermann Nitsch for six weeks in 1988. In my library of molecules are a few nitriles that smell of fresh air and blood. All of that iron in the blood is possibly being converted into some kind of nitrogen molecule -all of the nitrogen based molecules smelt throughout this study (and there are not that many in aroma chemistry) have a blood note lurking somewhere within them.

[3] Nitsch is a prolific producer of audio recordings of minimalist high powered organ based drone music.

[4] Serres, Michelle Genesis  Collective Furor page 65


[1] Perfumery Practice and Principles Robert R Calkin and J. Stephan Jellinek John Wiley and sons, Inc. 1994 pg. 76 The Biological basis for aesthetics.

 

Posted byDavid Hainesat6:47 PM1 commentsLinks

Experimental Writing Week 5 Conceptual/NET

Lawrence Wiener

“A key member of the New York conceptual art world of the 1960s, for over forty years he has been using language as his primary material.  Whilst usually taking the form of large typographic wall texts he refers to his work as sculpture, and the words, phrases and statements he employs are often representative of states or processes grounded in the physical world.”

http://www.ubu.com/concept/weiner_tracce.html

John Balderssari

Net Art

Artist statement Generator

http://www.playdamage.org/market-o-matic/

Song Lyric Generator

http://www.song-lyrics-generator.org.uk/

Death Null

digital graveyard

http://www.deathnull.org/?what=about

http://www.kranx.pl/

http://www.ljudmila.org/~vuk/ascii/film/

Grammatron

grammatron.gif

The GRAMMATRON project is a “public domain narrative environment” developed by virtual artist Mark Amerika in conjunction with the Brown University Graduate Creative Writing Program and the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Graphics and Visualization Center as well as with the support of many individuals without whom none of this would be possible.

The project consists of over over 1100 text spaces, 2000 links, 40+ minutes of original soundtrack delivered via Real Audio 3.0, unique hyperlink structures by way of specially-coded Javascripts, a virtual gallery featuring scores of animated and still life images, and more storyworld development than any other narrative created exclusively for the Web. A story about cyberspace, Cabala mysticism, digicash paracurrencies and the evolution of virtual sex in a society afraid to go outside and get in touch with its own nature, GRAMMATRON depicts a near-future world where stories are no longer conceived for book production but are instead created for a more immersive networked-narrative environment that, taking place on the Net, calls into question how a narrative is composed, published and distributed in the age of digital dissemination.

The GRAMMATRON project has been exhibited at many international museums and festivals including Ars Electronica, The International Symposium for Electronic Art (ISEA), SIGGRAPH 98, The Telstra Adelaide Arts Festival (South Australia), Virtual Worlds 98 (Paris) and the International Biennial of Film and Architecture (Graz).

GRAMMATRON was one of the first works of Internet Art to ever be included in the prestigious Whitney Biennial (2000).

You can enter GRAMMATRON now or visit the companion theory-guide called Hypertextual Consciousness or, if you prefer, go to The Alt-X Online Publishing Network to see where this all started.

For essays and articles on the developmental process behind GRAMMATRON, see Mark Amerika’s Amerika-Online column at Alt-X

http://www.grammatron.com/gtron1.0/a45.html

WaxWeb

http://www2.iath.virginia.edu/wax/

Study Resource Below

http://www.net-art.org/

3rd Year Photomedia Studio Week 2 & 3 response to presentations.

FREE FLUXUS READER – YIPPY !!!

http://www.artandeducation.net/announcement/fluxus-reader-%E2%80%93-free-digital-edition/

FreeForm Notes.

  Notes are Out of sequence and from memory – I haven’t learnt names yet. PS: I sincerely hope I haven’t inadvertently forgotten anyone’s work -i will update next week and  if I have take it as a sign of premature ageing : )

Juan Gris and random forces, wide framing worked in first image, melancholy yellow light – breaking technical rules is important because it opens things up. In the frame, a small garden of upside down flowers of decreasing size is depicted. Then we see  cadaver portraits drained of colour and yet  luminous, then close up of flesh that looked filmic- cyan – David Lynch territory – wormholes between different places where Lynch busts apart spatial distance, as  seen in his  Inland Empire – dumps the cinematic gloss for a raw aesthetic. Hair behind a backlit sheet… like a black waterfall falling into an abyss. Jacob shows  to the class, the black box of a Western digital hard drive that is archiving his culture and at the same time he wages a (fictional) war on certain agencies who would like to arrest his powers of looking and reading  and listening.

Then we have thermonuclear information theory through cellular structures of CNN footage on a wall image -next to chaos of white noise – Hillel Schwartz book is mentioned “Making Noise – from babel to the big bang and beyond.”  We then discussed entropy and the second law – Artist names the work “Explosions in the sky” and it shows how art can generate, run parallel and be a tool for theory -A’s ? PowerPoint resembles a black wall with dense white text, connecting her approach with the situationists and shows a strong political ethos… Postscripts for the society of Control (see text below) Oh yes,  jumping back to presentation, starting with SOPHIE CALLE and the porosity of privacy, social networks – DATA left behind on hard drives would need to be a lifestyle choice within the practice, ….. then we see Times Square as 3d video as stills, how the red / blue shift tears open layers and then when they go back together, it jumps out as an illusion…discussion of sensors, ps2 keyboard controller hack, max MSP software, multiscreen installation.Then we go to the “FAIRFIELD GHETTO” as process art – Harmony Korine – later thinking Larry Clark…silkcreening, attacking the image, wall construction in a room, trippy lighting, cut and paste fragments like a sketchbook writ large ??? later thinking DOGMA CINEMA…realism as collage. We saw highly adept square portraits of older people kissing and then we saw a girl in a bath with her breasts floating in green water. Then 2 images appeared, one of a girl who looked like a model wrapped in newspaper and another in plastic and duct tape – highly stylised not pornographic and then – what is a fetish ? affectation and altered state, the image can hide the truth, is she happy or not about being taped up and wrapped in plastic ? Some people like to wear diapers – this causes visceral reaction in lecturer who says he is ok with that reaction (and still is) this surpises Jacob, but lecturer thinks why should there be a prohibition on instinct – working out the territory – description by ??? of a beautiful horsehead mask that was neccessary for the act of lovemaking to occur.

WEEK 3. There are so many bodies floating and levitating – a women hangs from the doorframe and somehow this is weirdly erotic (to my eye) but in the photo next to it, another person is hiding under a fallen door…was she/he hiding or crushed? These images exude an aura – perhaps because of their technical imperfection re – focus and because they are black and white? In the next sequence we see figures from  Charles Ray held to the wall with planks of wood, long haired figures in plain clothes. There is something quasi- religious in these images like some weird theological torture chamber – Christ like figures pushed against a white wall by a plank of wood – a performance art piece done in a shaker compound perhaps? Or great satire of the ‘holy’ power of the art world ?

Going back a week, birds make art on guitar strings – but birds being the animals they are have always been great artists. What became of those birds I wonder? Animals and art who wins -who is better off ? Guitars and art always seem to go well together SEE – MARCO FUSINATO….   I add a link to my dear friends who have OWNED this territory for over twenty years (click here)….Then we see that beautiful image of a late teen floating above city lights…then a fantasy  – imagine if the proposition in the photo was that a plane with a cargo of dead girls somehow was losing its cargo – the orientation would be slightly different if she was falling, and then there would be holes ripped in her singlet exposing the pallid flesh and this would be a reason…a reason that we do not get from this image that is absent of a narrative – she is free floating I guess. There is something unlikable about this image for me as a viewer. We must come back to discuss more about this artist in the future, I am sure people would have lots to say about it. Then an image from  Magritte at night – the frame is split between day and night this is such a clever division, an art direction challenge for sure…compositing in photoshop, long exposures in the suburbs – doing this on pushbike would be lots of fun.

Hillel Schwartz’s remarkable book on noise can be found in the SCA library also  a link to zone books where you can download the 900 pages of footnotes http://www.zonebooks.org/titles/SCHW_MAK.html

Gilles Deleuze, “Postscript on the Societies of Control”, from _OCTOBER_ 59, Winter 1992, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, pp. 3-7.

OCTOBER (ISSN 0162-2870) (ISBN 0-262-75209-3) is published quarterly (Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring) by the MIT Press, 55 Hayward Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 and London, England.

This essay, which first appeared in L’Autre journal, no. 1 (May 1990), is included in the forthcoming translation of Pourparlers(Paris: Editions Minuit, 1990), to be published by Columbia University Press.

“Postscript on the Societies of Control” Gilles Deleuze

1. Historical

Foucault located the disciplinary societies in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; they reach their height at the outset of the twentieth. They initiate the organization of vast spaces of enclosure. The individual never ceases passing from one closed environment to another, each having its own laws: first the family; then the school (“you are no longer in your family”); then the barracks (“you are no longer at school”); then the factory; from time to time the hospital; possibly the prison, the preeminent instance of the enclosed environment. It’s the prison that serves as the analogical model: at the sight of some laborers, the heroine of Rossellini’s Europa ’51could exclaim, “I thought I was seeing convicts.”

Foucault has brilliantly analyzed the ideal project of these environments of enclosure, particularly visible within the factory: to concentrate; to distribute in space; to order in time; to compose a productive force within the dimension of space-time whose effect will be greater than the sum of its component forces. But what Foucault recognized as well was the transience of this model: it succeeded that of the societies of sovereignty, the goal and functions of which were something quite different (to tax rather than to organize production, to rule on death rather than to administer life); the transition took place over time, and Napoleon seemed to effect the large-scale conversion from one society to the other. But in their turn the disciplines underwent a crisis to the benefit of new forces that were gradually instituted and which accelerated after World War II: a disciplinary society was what we already no longer were, what we had ceased to be.

We are in a generalized crisis in relation to all the environments of enclosure–prison, hospital, factory, school, family. The family is an “interior,” in crisis like all other interiors–scholarly, professional, etc. The administrations in charge never cease announcing supposedly necessary reforms: to reform schools, to reform industries, hospitals, the armed forces, prisons. But everyone knows that these institutions are finished, whatever the length of their expiration periods. It’s only a matter of administering their last rites and of keeping people employed until the installation of the new forces knocking at the door. These are the societies of control, which are in the process of replacing disciplinary societies. “Control” is the name Burroughs proposes as a term for the new monster, one that Foucault recognizes as our immediate future. Paul Virilio also is continually analyzing the ultrarapid forms of free-floating control that replaced the old disciplines operating in the time frame of a closed system. There is no need to invoke the extraordinary pharmaceutical productions, the molecular engineering, the genetic manipulations, although these are slated to enter the new process. There is no need to ask which is the toughest regime, for it’s within each of them that liberating and enslaving forces confront one another. For example, in the crisis of the hospital as environment of enclosure, neighborhood clinics, hospices, and day care could at first express new freedom, but they could participate as well in mechanisms of control that are equal to the harshest of confinements. There is no need to fear or hope, but only to look for new weapons.

2. Logic

The different internments of spaces of enclosure through which the individual passes are independent variables: each time one us supposed to start from zero, and although a common language for all these places exists, it is analogical. One the other hand, the different control mechanisms are inseparable variations, forming a system of variable geometry the language of which is numerical (which doesn’t necessarily mean binary). Enclosures are molds, distinct castings, but controls are a modulation, like a self-deforming cast that will continuously change from one moment to the other, or like a sieve whose mesh will transmute from point to point.

This is obvious in the matter of salaries: the factory was a body that contained its internal forces at the level of equilibrium, the highest possible in terms of production, the lowest possible in terms of wages; but in a society of control, the corporation has replaced the factory, and the corporation is a spirit, a gas. Of course the factory was already familiar with the system of bonuses, but the corporation works more deeply to impose a modulation of each salary, in states of perpetual metastability that operate through challenges, contests, and highly comic group sessions. If the most idiotic television game shows are so successful, it’s because they express the corporate situation with great precision. The factory constituted individuals as a single body to the double advantage of the boss who surveyed each element within the mass and the unions who mobilized a mass resistance; but the corporation constantly presents the brashest rivalry as a healthy form of emulation, an excellent motivational force that opposes individuals against one another and runs through each, dividing each within. The modulating principle of “salary according to merit” has not failed to tempt national education itself. Indeed, just as the corporation replaces the factory, perpetual training tends to replace the school, and continuous control to replace the examination. Which is the surest way of delivering the school over to the corporation.

In the disciplinary societies one was always starting again (from school to the barracks, from the barracks to the factory), while in the societies of control one is never finished with anything–the corporation, the educational system, the armed services being metastable states coexisting in one and the same modulation, like a universal system of deformation. In The Trial, Kafka, who had already placed himself at the pivotal point between two types of social formation, described the most fearsome of judicial forms. The apparent acquittal of the disciplinary societies (between two incarcerations); and the limitless postponements of the societies of control (in continuous variation) are two very different modes of juridicial life, and if our law is hesitant, itself in crisis, it’s because we are leaving one in order to enter the other. The disciplinary societies have two poles: the signature that designates the individual, and the number or administrative numeration that indicates his or her position within a mass. This is because the disciplines never saw any incompatibility between these two, and because at the same time power individualizes and masses together, that is, constitutes those over whom it exercises power into a body and molds the individuality of each member of that body. (Foucault saw the origin of this double charge in the pastoral power of the priest–the flock and each of its animals–but civil power moves in turn and by other means to make itself lay “priest.”) In the societies of control, on the other hand, what is important is no longer either a signature or a number, but a code: the code is a password, while on the other hand disciplinary societies are regulated by watchwords (as much from the point of view of integration as from that of resistance). The numerical language of control is made of codes that mark access to information, or reject it. We no longer find ourselves dealing with the mass/individual pair. Individuals have become “dividuals,” and masses, samples, data, markets, or “banks.” Perhaps it is money that expresses the distinction between the two societies best, since discipline always referred back to minted money that locks gold as numerical standard, while control relates to floating rates of exchange, modulated according to a rate established by a set of standard currencies. The old monetary mole is the animal of the space of enclosure, but the serpent is that of the societies of control. We have passed from one animal to the other, from the mole to the serpent, in the system under which we live, but also in our manner of living and in our relations with others. The disciplinary man was a discontinuous producer of energy, but the man of control is undulatory, in orbit, in a continuous network. Everywhere surfing has already replaced the older sports.

Types of machines are easily matched with each type of society–not that machines are determining, but because they express those social forms capable of generating them and using them. The old societies of sovereignty made use of simple machines–levers, pulleys, clocks; but the recent disciplinary societies equipped themselves with machines involving energy, with the passive danger of entropy and the active danger of sabotage; the societies of control operate with machines of a third type, computers, whose passive danger is jamming and whose active one is piracy or the introduction of viruses. This technological evolution must be, even more profoundly, a mutation of capitalism, an already well-known or familiar mutation that can be summed up as follows: nineteenth-century capitalism is a capitalism of concentration, for production and for property. It therefore erects a factory as a space of enclosure, the capitalist being the owner of the means of production but also, progressively, the owner of other spaces conceived through analogy (the worker’s familial house, the school). As for markets, they are conquered sometimes by specialization, sometimes by colonization, sometimes by lowering the costs of production. But in the present situation, capitalism is no longer involved in production, which it often relegates to the Third World, even for the complex forms of textiles, metallurgy, or oil production. It’s a capitalism of higher-order production. It no-longer buys raw materials and no longer sells the finished products: it buys the finished products or assembles parts. What it wants to sell is services but what it wants to buy is stocks. This is no longer a capitalism for production but for the product, which is to say, for being sold or marketed. Thus is essentially dispersive, and the factory has given way to the corporation. The family, the school, the army, the factory are no longer the distinct analogical spaces that converge towards an owner–state or private power–but coded figures–deformable and transformable–of a single corporation that now has only stockholders. Even art has left the spaces of enclosure in order to enter into the open circuits of the bank. The conquests of the market are made by grabbing control and no longer by disciplinary training, by fixing the exchange rate much more than by lowering costs, by transformation of the product more than by specialization of production. Corruption thereby gains a new power. Marketing has become the center or the “soul” of the corporation. We are taught that corporations have a soul, which is the most terrifying news in the world. The operation of markets is now the instrument of social control and forms the impudent breed of our masters. Control is short-term and of rapid rates of turnover, but also continuous and without limit, while discipline was of long duration, infinite and discontinuous. Man is no longer man enclosed, but man in debt. It is true that capitalism has retained as a constant the extreme poverty of three-quarters of humanity, too poor for debt, too numerous for confinement: control will not only have to deal with erosions of frontiers but with the explosions within shanty towns or ghettos.

3. Program

The conception of a control mechanism, giving the position of any element within an open environment at any given instant (whether animal in a reserve or human in a corporation, as with an electronic collar), is not necessarily one of science fiction. F lix Guattari has imagined a city where one would be able to leave one’s apartment, one’s street, one’s neighborhood, thanks to one’s (dividual) electronic card that raises a given barrier; but the card could just as easily be rejected on a given day or between certain hours; what counts is not the barrier but the computer that tracks each person’s position–licit or illicit–and effects a universal modulation.

The socio-technological study of the mechanisms of control, grasped at their inception, would have to be categorical and to describe what is already in the process of substitution for the disciplinary sites of enclosure, whose crisis is everywhere proclaimed. It may be that older methods, borrowed from the former societies of sovereignty, will return to the fore, but with the necessary modifications. What counts is that we are at the beginning of something. In the prison system: the attempt to find penalties of “substitution,” at least for petty crimes, and the use of electronic collars that force the convicted person to stay at home during certain hours. For the school system: continuous forms of control, and the effect on the school of perpetual training, the corresponding abandonment of all university research, the introduction of the “corporation” at all levels of schooling. For the hospital system: the new medicine “without doctor or patient” that singles out potential sick people and subjects at risk, which in no way attests to individuation–as they say–but substitutes for the individual or numerical body the code of a “dividual” material to be controlled. In the corporate system: new ways of handling money, profits, and humans that no longer pass through the old factory form. These are very small examples, but ones that will allow for better understanding of what is meant by the crisis of the institutions, which is to say, the progressive and dispersed installation of a new system of domination. One of the most important questions will concern the ineptitude of the unions: tied to the whole of their history of struggle against the disciplines or within the spaces of enclosure, will they be able to adapt themselves or will they give way to new forms of resistance against the societies of control? Can we already grasp the rough outlines of the coming forms, capable of threatening the joys of marketing? Many young people strangely boast of being “motivated”; they re-request apprenticeships and permanent training. It’s up to them to discover what they’re being made to serve, just as their elders discovered, not without difficulty, the telos of the disciplines. The coils of a serpent are even more complex that the burrows of a molehill.

# finger for adress

Experimental Writing Week 2

heanifestation of text has appeared across a multiplicity of art forms. This open studio investigates text and language in art, via self-directed pthat are unbounded by medium and yet use writing as the genesis or as primary material for the production of a work of Art. This subject encompasses a terrain that potentially goes from street art to high culture.

 

Students are able to work in an open ended way with text, either as starting point or as a finished work. From a screenplay or work of fiction to a body of paintings or sculptures. From Artists books, zines, net art and editions the ultimate form that the work takes is determined by the needs of the idea proposed. The subject can also encompass time based art forms such as video, sound, and performance art. This open studio interdisciplinary subject investigates text and writing as a generator of potential new art forms and hybrids.

 

Students will work by way of a Self Directed Project and on one short in class project. The subject will be taught by way of tutorials, group critique, workshops, lectures and guest lectures.

Project one

 Jenny Holzer

http://youtu.be/CxrxnPLmqEs

Paul Mcathy

http://www.ubu.com/film/mccarthy_painter.html

Experiments with Fluxalons

This is a short introductory project due in week 6 in which students will present a completed concrete poem or text in any medium other than in the form of text written on paper. The task implies translation in some way of a text into a new and interesting form. This could be presented through performance, moving image, web-art, on canvass, as a sculptural object, as mail art, or through a form of photomedia.

Students are encouraged to explore unusual methodologies in the genesis of their writing. This could be through generative software, appropriation of other texts, original writing, autobiographic sources, historical forms etc.

Students will be encouraged to show work in progress along the way and to discuss their approaches with fellow students in class time. Examples of interesting work in the field will be shown along the way.

SELF DIRECTED PROJECT

Due Week 15:  Assessment week beginning 18th June. Note final date to be confirmed

In consultation with your lecturer propose a self-directed project involving experimental writing. The progress of this project will be assessed at Mid Semester Review in Week 6. Due to week 7 being academic advice this review may spill over into week 8.

Julie Rrapp’s class second year photomedia

1.

wiki Feedback

Video feedback

I am sitting in a room – Alvin Lucier

2.

Meat Art – Logic of Sensation, Gilles Deleauze on Francis Bacon

Gilles Deleuze was one of the most influential and revolutionary philosophers of the 20th century. Francis Bacon is widely regarded as one of the most radical painters of the 20th century. This title presents a deep engagement with Bacon’s work and the nature of art. Deleuze analyses the distinctive innovations that came to mark Bacon’s style: the isolation of the figure, the violent deformations of the flesh, the complex use of colour, the method of chance, and the use of the triptych form. Along the way, Deleuze introduces a number of his own famous concepts, such as the “body without organs” and the “diagram”, and contrasts his own approach to painting with that of both the phenomenological and the art historical traditions. Deleuze links Bacon’s work to Cezanne’s notion of a “logic” of sensation, which reaches its summit in colour and the “colouring sensation”. Investigating this logic, Deleuze explores Bacon’s crucial relation to past painters such as Velasquez, Cezanne and Soutine, as well as Bacon’s rejection of expressionism and abstract painting.
About the Author Daniel W. Smith

it is the body that attempts to escape from itself by means of . . . . in short, a spasm: the body as plexus, and its effort or waiting for a spasm. […] There is one painting that can guide us, the Figure at a Washbasin of 1976 [80]: clinging to the oval of the washbasin, its hands clutching the faucets, the body-Figure exerts an intense motionless effort upon itself in order to escape down the blackness of the drain. (11c) from This blog
3.

SCA: Second year Studio Major: Artist Books /Alt Publishing part 2

THis is the second part to the scattergun notes for Second Yr Studio Major.

Week 5: In class CYANOTYPERAMA where we all get to make cyanotypes.

Here is a good link to how the process works.

You will need to bring some good quality Water Colour Paper.
SOme kind of negative that is probably larger than 35mm, you may choose to collect plants from your garden or other thin profiled objects to use as a resist.

SCA: First Year Photomedia Studio Major Flying Dragon Archive

Links and resources relating to 1st year studio major and the Flying Dragon Archive : Virtual Museum of the Impossible.

Here is a link to a website of found things

Some questions for discussion.

1. What is poetry – what do you think is the nature of the poetic ?

Visualisation – requires a vivid image in the mind. Perhaps some of the following questions might help you to conjure the Level of Detail [LOD] required to visualise the project. LOD ?

[Level of Detail is an important notion to consider when you are inventing things or trying to simulate something that is pre-existing. ]

here is a good explanation in the world of 3d computer graphics but this concept can also be applied to any kind of creative methodology particualrly where some form of representation occurs – note the figurative example

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Level_of_detail

2. The Flying Dragon Archive exists in a virtual space but what if it where to exist in the world of physical space? What might the external architecture look like ? 1a If you could imagine the Flying Dragon Archive in a physical world situation what might its interior consist of.

Here is an example of a visionary project by some artists to do the seemingly ‘impossible’ and to save polaroid film from extinction

He isnt a photographer but he sure is a visionary Theo Jansen once built an image scanner and large format printer out of junk before any one had invented an image scanner or a printer and certainly the personal computer had yet to arrive here is a link to his later work, but I will also show you footage of this incredible invention.

Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration Into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel is a 2008 book by theoretical physicist Michio Kaku. In the wiki page entry on the book we see an interesting classification system for ‘the Impossible’ in light of technological invention.

Technology and the future possible and its extension into the seemingly impossible go hand in hand, (think about the world conjured in science fiction) its the nature of our humaness to think this way and our modernity has been geared towards this kind of positivism as a force for over a century, but what other types of ‘Impossibles’ can you imagine that are less technocratic ?

For a basic explanation of the term positivism go here

PETER FISCHLI & DAVID WEISS

The Way Things Go Wiki entry here. Interestingly the former article highlights the RUBE GOLDBERG MACHINE the wiki entry for that is here
A retrospective of the Artists work was held at the Tate Modern in 2007 and the link is here

SCA: Second Year Studio Major [Artist books Alt.Publishing]

Various scattergun notes and links relating to second year studio major (photomedia)
cdbox1

ALT.Publishing and Artist Books

Queensland State Library Online resources on Artist Books

A really concise history of the Artist Book from Yale Library

An incredible website about all things Artist Books, the BookArt Web particularly good for tutorials on the making of various types of bindings.

Here is a link to an Artist Book I made last year with Joyce Hinterding with contibuting texts by Amanda Williams and Anne Finegan titled ” The Immaterial’s Langauge Molecules Vibrations ” it also might give you some ideas about how to use a blogging platform like wordpress as a CMS (content management system)

Heres some practical links to the craft of bookbinding

Adapted article on japanese stitching

And here is a link to an excellent website on Japanese bookbinding showing the accordian style bookbinding which is the method we shall use for our class assignment

Zine Links

Big List of Zines

Independent Publishing Resource Center

Lathe Cut Records

Peter King Lathe Cut Record Manufacturing

Important Links to Artist Books via two of the most famous outlets for Artist Books

Printed Matter NY

Online website of Bookie Wookie a shop in Amsterdam that only sells Artist Books

Practical Links/Technique

A good link relevant to the Inclass project on Paper folding Techniques

ELECTRONIC

Here is a link to Ipaper by Scribd

Force & Syntax

What is a force you might say? – Its not that complicated. A force belongs first to movement and then to a multiplicity and a becoming. A force is a movement, an interaction – “when a mountain collapses, what was once still beneath the sky falls downwards and interacts with what it touches. Thankfully, it’s not always this dramatic. A force then, is simply a dynamic interaction between some states.

The forces that exist in art works that are unleashed, however, exist at a different scale to the mountain, they exist at the scale of the molecular and the energetic, in the form of waves – pressure waves of sound, or photons of light commonly thought of as a wave, but actually a frequency and now, lately in my own work – actual molecules – things that are normally thought of as having not much substance or even no substance at all, in the case of the work in the gallery they are an emission of types of energy, providing a strong psychic and physical presence in the space, they figure more obviously in the collaborations that involve the electromagnetic, but also lets not forget that forces operate at the level of ideas (which is something that has no physical substance) and they also operate at the level of representations that transmit time from beyond the present into the present. It’s important to remember that there are gentle forces as well. Forces that are the barest whisper, soft rain like we get in the mountains – or a lovers breath and even the works that don’t have resonating sculptural structures in them also contain other mysterious forces.

Sometimes forces are fabricated virtual arenas – fabulations – synthetic fabulations – a house vents its contents into an imagined and yet credibly realised artificial anti -gravity – or a different kind of house vents water endlessly, forever, as if nature had found a menacing musical dimension in the form of seemingly infinite loops, eddies and reversals of flow.

Even models and simulations can create a force in the world if they are capable of giving shock or wonder. If even something as still and manufactured as a maquette or model is capable of shock, then naturally, concepts and ideas can also create shocks and rifts out of the chaos –“tearing a slit in the firmament” as DH Lawrence would say.

Representations are signs that emit, but this emission at the level of signifier is also a force that is on par with the physical dimension of forces that I am describing. The Neo-Gothic house in the work, House Two gathers up and transmits the gothic line into the viewers mind – the gothic line enters the room softly as a familiar trace. This is why I like the gallery space – it’s a container for these things, a container without distractions. This is why we like the book it’s a little machine and a container of emissions. Books get inside the head and cause the mind to make projections onto its screen and we live with books as if in a waking dream. Books are a kind of dwelling – they house things both psychic and real, when full of facts they become like museums filled with time abstractions. Books perhaps are not made to represent but to represent a reality that is yet to arrive. For every configuration of image, word, text or sound there is a kind of composite that takes place, a multiplicity that forms a new world. Why because one is constructing, construction itself. This is what the Artist is doing.

Let’s not forget what it means to be an Artist. An artist is a force in the world as well. So is a priest, or a judge or a teacher, forces are not limited to only non human phenomena – there are powerful musical forces. Walking in a manner is also a force and even a style, a certain gait, I have a friend, she has a beautiful style to the way she walks, sometimes fast with long strides, sometimes stealthily like a cat. I saw it the other day at twilight in the mountains – we where filming with a contraption that also causes one to walk in a mysterious and extra dimensional way; there are different modes, speeds and differentials, a whole multiplicity to walking. And language certainly has a rhythm.
Lately these rythms are intensified and worked with in Hip Hop lets take Aesop Rock by way of an example

Who broke the verbal squad sensor? Root down, feelers out across the marsh before it was “Awesome Car! ” I called in car cavalry cooked in an 85 Dodge Aries, gas for Huntington and back barely. Equipped with super soakers full of piss and an uncanny knack for constantly upsetting pigs by doing stupid shit. The kid? bartered? his ring king dummies to King Cullen where they hollered “F**k the World” from a parking lot of the suburbs. A couple spray cans and a little litter, but they’d look at us like swindlers with them Ricky Kasso jitters. So f**k em, a glutton sunk into the alley for props but things will still go bump when them halogens pop. Believe. I’ll be there when it happens so shake another place off the mantel, snake another flames off the candle, lady of the lake off the answers, admitting their mistakes to their? deplaning? cadavers. Now it’s rest in peace when Peter’s? sinner heaters sung? disturbingly referred to reevaluate your beast of burden’s urgency. Damn doggy, good times, thanks. I wrote your name in wet cement by the Brooklyn banks.

[Chorus:]
?… Smack? for later. Made a fire, made a wheel, made a snack for later. Catacomb kids cuddle up and test the paper. When the town’s speed freaks sleep, trap the traitor. He will ask for papers.? See I’m a nice invader?, made a roof, made a weapon, made a flag from paper by the snotty little nuzzle of a latchkey neighbor. When the? pope does shaggy? over some dap from gators, he will catch the vapors.

But so does a series of images, there are all kinds of atmospheres and territories and timeframes that appear from a series of images, images in series. Isn’t there a syntax of darkness that comes with Hensons landscapes or time frozen in Jeff Walls dramatic scenes.

Humans are capable of creating extra dimensionality by using an artists logic which contains all the sense of nonesense. This is why Tarkovsky’s, levitational love making scene in his film The Sacrifice, totally stands up, because it’s not really that far out of reach and it seems natural within the very curious logic of the narrative

Everything that interacts belongs to the nature of a force. The colonisers used walking in a different way – armies marching across the fields – a terrible kind of harnessing of chaos – and then our indigenous peoples mysterious walking on their dreaming tracks – I walked on one in the Wollemi wild country recently and saw drawings on the walls of caves, some look like women with ectoplasmic nets coming from their mouths or maybe I wondered, if these powerful drawings was also some kind of premonition of the speech bubble, to come.

What is a becoming you might ask? It is a joyful leap into plurality, an embrace of change and experience – a discovery of freedom – it is according to Nietzsche to live life naturally, with the multiplicity, rather than through fixed conceptions of the one truth or how the One universe is conceived. The common model then is thrown out the window. One no longer has to struggle with the reconciliation of a fixed abstract conception that never seems to adequately stand up to the reality of the polyphony of a life and change becomes a productive force away from the centre rather than an experience of discomfort.

I have come to think of the artwork itself – any artwork as a kind of transmitter or radiator of energy, once it reaches the brain, new pathways are electrically connected and wired up and we gain extra consciousness as a result. A necessity when the world presents a continual unceasing, multiplicity. This might be one part of the reason that Art has had such endurance, even through great traumatic events in history, or has managed to have a place in the most turbulent of cultures. Perhaps it’s playing a role in the drive towards the required evolution of our subjectivity. – it might be the hunger in the brain – its appetite.

The vibe I am detecting of late, is significant interest within some parts of critical theory and philosophy, with cognition and neuroscience; that presents a turn towards something far more visceral , expressive and trans-disciplinary – another multiplicity. There is still interest in an emission of signs, of course, but there is also a biological investigation brought into the fold that goes as far as taking into account even the quantum level of scales which are mysterious forces to say the least.
And, I think this is a productive turn. Deleuze himself says that he believes more in the future of molecular biology of the brain, than in the future of information science, or of any theory of communication, perhaps some people are taking their cues from him, after all, Foucault joked, “ that this century would become Deleuzian “.

With the art then, it’s both a mind fuck and a physical thing; they can’t really be separated. It could be said that the work happens in the head, a strange manifestation of touching the cave and folds of the inside of the head. Thankfully then, we are really talking about waves, particles and photons and mental images, not anything larger than that. Molecules are indeed tiny; you cannot see them with the naked eye

The work then is all about revealing a force – something in movement – light that enters, sound that enters, forces that act on the senses. The works are structures that stand up for a time, that enter the body. Why use the word “styling” you might ask? Because style, is as much a question of inhabitation of a particular territory, as it is of a particular type of speaking or syntax – ‘you wear particular ensembles of clothes that present your style” style creates a territory, it’s also an inhabitation, of a multiplicity of modes and qualities.

Fashion sense, its easy to dismiss, but look at the way its changing all the time – there is a definite time base, involved – tied to capital for sure, but also tied to desire, so we cant even dismiss something that feels vulgar at times – marketing – the true enemy of fashion. The winds of change in dressing are tied to a flow of data as much as to what costumes we decide to emit. Even if you don’t think you have style, you have a style.

The force could be said to be waiting for its coupling, this is a strange idea – one of completing the circuit. Art then is also another kind of electricity.
Art calls to the viewer. It doesn’t always call out in the same way that the media does, or other types of communication do – overly clipped and in high resolution – something literal and vulgar – art allows for mysterious and unintelligible forms of communication to be part of the equation and done with a kind of elegance, even if its of the ugly, this is its primary difference from the “everything else, whatever” and provides an antidote for what Adam Gezy described the other day in his seminar , as the “tribunal of boredom” in our contemporary world. Art puts a show stopper on opinions and provides a kind of “station break “ where we can all finally put down our guns and breathe a sigh of relief.

Art is the best vehicle for the forces we work with too transmit, because they reach people who are receptive – it might be that some of these forces have appeared in the past as something uncanny in a science lab, or as data in a report, but who would they be reaching in that setting – who would they enter, not enough people. Not that the forces them selves care either way, of course – but from the perspective of someone who is interested in discovering them and someone who is a kind of medium of these forces, I think Art is the best way to allow these things to make an appearance in the world. There is a real specificity in art, in these relationships, because the works are formed from very specific assemblages and sets of relationships that would never be allowed to coincide in other disciplines. Look at the authentic characters of art that Brancusi gave us for example – a strange brass form resembling a bird and a kind of twisted smooth brass cylinder – a character to come later in the Alien films or as any number of future characters in science fiction, fashion, photography or architecture. Artists are literally sketching our future. I am no scientist, even though parts of the work use scientific principles; mindful of a formula set out by Proust, which is one of – “ speaking as a foreigner in ones own tongue” allows a certain kind of wisdom based on stupidity, to be elevated, never becoming too much the authority on anything, poking around in the dark , in other words, I like to grab what I need, from a multiplicity of activities, its one way to stop complacency, you never quite feel like one is on top of things – the algorithm for images, physics and optics for imaging the sun, perfumery ( that one alone contains a lifetime of experimental knowledge to be explored). Make no mistake about it, the methodology may follow aspects of scientific or technological processes, but it’s always done only in relationship to art and curiosity – which is the work. Is there not a hidden wisdom even in Naivety?

The forces that are revealed are tied to the specific assemblages or laminates of Art. What is an assemblage? I barely need to say it; but for the sake of the argument today, it is a construction of things, a bunch of materials – a compositional plane (the canvass – or the projection – or the political meeting) that provides the surfaces and corridors that allows the forces to transmit. A lamination is an overlay of elements welded together, a composition or composite of things solid or not solid. A kind of ramshackle, though sober constructivism is what I think I am engaged in.

We are all working in a discipline that is totally able to assimilate failure at the level of the work and the concept – is open enough to encompass the inadequate as much as the sublime and that allows for a whole universe of tangible and intangible things to coincide – such is the nature of the poetic. There is a lot of freedom in all of this, that makes our field unique as an activity…as you can see I am a lover, not a straightener – embedded in a practice that may even be able to encompass ultimately something as unimaginable as a collapse of the forms I’ve built up, the possibility of one day an inversion of all of the principles discovered in the trajectory, even at a cost that it becomes a kind of dark star on the work, that has preceded – Some days I dream about inverting everything – a folding back – eventually just making a turn around and why NOT !

Art is a totality that can accommodate its opposite – Anti-Art. What about engaging in a sweeping arc, a beautiful and graceful piroughette. Instead of emitting energy in the work, maybe the work could be all about sucking it in – Art as a black hole. Instead of a black house, build a house of timber and light, with crystalline shard forms instead of boxes. Or instead of gathering the energy out of the air -hold it back – invert all the forms . Instead of Noise – Silence. A ghostly presence suggested this on an airplane flying over the Pacific. Maybe the process has already started. A new work (a much too soon work) titled Telepathy, will start to do some of this inversion stuff.

I like this group statement very much from New No York – a bunch of friends working in the experimental sound scene, on the lower east side of Manhattan.

We have often been told that what we make is not music and generally we have no argument with that. If music is only sound constructed within what this day survives as the common notion of musicality, then, no, we don’t make music. This is not to say that we reject all sound-constructions developed within ‘music’ (in its narrowest sense) — there are certainly ideas developed within this tradition that we use — but we do believe that the traditional concept of music is too impoverished to encompass the sound worlds we wish to create. …..we are with those artists that desire the freedom to reject all rules/relations from everywhere. Taking our cue from Herbert Brun we call this Anti-music. As with Brun’s concept of anti-communication the ‘anti’ of anti-music is “used here as in antipodes, antiphony, antithesis, not meaning ‘hostile’ or ‘against’ but rather ‘juxtaposed’ or ‘from the other side’.”

SCA Foundation Concepts – [Media Arts] The illusion of life (or) The Living Dead

THE ILLUSION OF LIFE – (OR) THE LIVING DEAD
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Derrida talks in GHOSTDANCE

Notes for foundation concepts media arts: On this page a scattergun of links and ravings – comments will be open…..

here is one for prosthetics and the use of Gelatin

the Nightmare factory sells cheap prosthetics, masks and things

and another link (USA)

How to easily make a realistic facial prosthesis.

If you dont know about the web site Instructables you must check this link on the right hand side of the web page check out the related articles column on do it yourself make up special effects.

How to make fake blood

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Lars von Trier’s Antichrist – Official Trailer from Zentropa on Vimeo.

“> Antichrist Trailer

photoshop horror tute

20 horror cliches that will not die

How to make ghosts for your front yard

Into Music Into Sound

No Input

Sachiko M

Ryoji Ikeda

Ryoji Ikeda – #0001. Track from his new album “Test Pattern” 2008.

Ryoji Ikeda 2 @ Mutek mx (2007)

Alvin Lucier

Alvin Lucier general infomation from WIKI

I am sitting in a room

Music on a long thin wire 1977

Edgar Verese

Edgar Verese general info from WIKI

Ionisation conducted by Boulez

Karlheinz Stockhausen “Helicopter String Quartet”

John Cage

27 sounds manufactured in a kitchen – John Cage

Noise with John Cage (1966)

Charlemaine Palestine

Schlingen Blangen (1) at St.Giles London

Tony Conrad

Tony Conrad – Ten Years Alive on the Infinite Plain

MerzbowMinus Zero

Dead C   – “sky”

Bill Fontana, Objective Sound.

Pan Sonic Liuos




Resources:

Sound Waves And Their Sources (1933) – Educational film that covers the basics of acoustics. How sound propagates through a medium, pitch, timbre, loudness etc. Dated but accurate.

Hallucination Arts

Lecture from last week: David Haines 2007.

My body sings in every nerve ending as it glides towards a singing body.This singing body lives up to Spinoza’s expectation that “we don’t even know what a body is capable of “nor can “we know what a body is”.Since it was at once uncategorizable, without a proper name and yet undeniably there; Animal, Vegetable or Mineral?

This “Singing body” would call and I would levitate towards its sublime soundings by passing through bands of light and hovering motifs that resembled Japanese kites, – mind and body stretched on a rising polyphonic wave of motor-cross derived music.

Suburban creek and bush cave explorer, zones of intensity unfolded amongst wild fennel. Enfolded in balloon vine and touching the earth, grounding out a circuit that hurled each and every atom towards a deep and mysterious tidal pool at great-speed.It was brackish. For some moments I became the Martian landscapes of Daniel Paul Schreber.

The singing body – a plant being, animated geometry at the head and a non distinct mass at the base before me. Forming from a kind of image-light – a thin film of non- photons that appears not from daylight but from behind the eyes in the darkness of the skull. It was at once both a two dimensional and a three dimensional figure.

Light and colour manifest at the level of perception, the product of electrical energy. Receptors are stimulated & produce a change of state in the brain, in this case from a molecule that crosses the dermis via the lungs. What I was seeing was the light and colour of dreams during wakefulness. Perhaps a form of Anti- light and colour, like the place known as Antikythera (the opposite other) – a tiny island in the Ionian Sea, that sits next to the main island. Is this not then, the light and colour that sits to the side of sunlight,- a subteranean image field that manifests occasionally when awake, from the pockets and folds of the productive body and the chemical signals it produces. We are image factories. What is it about the molecule that allows one to produce everything internally – images and sounds ?

Generally, light and colour which hasn’t derived from the sun is considered to be artificial, an abberation. We know the common meaning of artificial “man made” but if we look back further we see it comes from the Latin “of or belonging to art,” from artificium. This is light derived inside the body at the level of perception. Some animals emit chemical light, producing bio-luminescance, but my feeling is that the images of perception that are lit up in dreams might be being formed at the sub-atomic level.

This notion of internalised light and colour, becomes an interesting, when we consider the role of the virtual camera in the production of images. This technology is central to many of the images we see today in cinema and photography – the camera doesn’t exist physically in the usual way. The camera is made up of binary code that acts as a data processor algorithmically working on sets of coordinates expressed as shaded values on a screen.

What is remarkable is that this is an image system that is beyond glass optics. A method of representation known as ray tracing, partially made possible and used by Descartes, in his analysis of rainbows.4. These images generated by computer are simulations that can seem so real as to easily convince the viewer that what they are seeing has been photographed conventionally. Raytracing uses a collection of formula of physical laws in a Cartesian coordinate space, to draw a picture. In short, ray-tracing is a system of virtual – photography. Technology occults, it de-conceals. Insistently, images are born out of the darkness of this mathematical universe. It’s like a miracle. The function of a wave.

Video art works are hallucinatory & luminous apparitions, cast as light on the wall of a gallery. A surface without substance – smooth space of the image, turned on and then off, in the same way a vision in the mind appears and disappears. This is dematerialised art as opposed to the fattiness of impasto, the heaviness of stone or the immobility of a stuffed cat, wrapped in sticky tape and melted plastic.

I discovered early on, that the actions of molecules produced events. In my current exploration of the molecular affects of the aromatic molecules of perfumery (and there role in the production of new types Post Object Art) we find ourselves swept up in another, (thankfully) far safer form of intoxication – one that is a powerful trigger of thoughts, sensations, memories and feelings.

Perfumes seem like intoxicants, far more benign than the aromatic – hydrocarbons that are central to the act of sniffing glue. Aromatic molecules enter the body and go very quickly to the brain. The mechanism of smell is not yet entirely understood. Some of the chemicals behind common perfumes are the starting materials of psychedelic tryptamines that have been thoroughly explored in organic chemistry and consumed throughout the twentieth century and explored for millennia as part of traditional religious rituals.5. Many of these precursors, are also found in food and knowledge of the interaction of some of the more challenging odorant molecules has helped inform the radical and fascinating food movement known as Molecular Gastronomy. A field that amounts to in some ways as the “high art” branch of the experimental culinary arts. Other aromatic molecules are known attractors in the world of animals.

Take a molecule like Indole, it is found in lots of places, in nature – Indole is an important perfumery molecule and is also a close relative to Serotonin, it also forms the central ring of LSD. It is said, that serotonin doesn’t smell like Indole because apparently it is non – volatile. Serotonin doesn’t fly like Indole. Its use in perfumery is because it is found in Orange Blossom and Jasmine and I suspect because it has a strong boosting effect, in the same way that your shit has a density to its odorousness. Its certainly has a feacal character.

Indole is found in pig’s liver, truffles and white chocolate and many other desirable foods. Once you know its bottom of grandma’s closet (napthalene – when in full concentration) you can smell it everywhere. Indole, in high concentrations (as a synthesised molecule) is downright faecal and with good reason, you would know it from the smell of your own shit which along with Scatol, the methylated version, is loaded with it. In extreme dilution it is rather pleasent. In spring, I can smell it in our garden and spring is that fragrant happy time when our mood lifts.

There are many examples of close resemblances to active molecules in perfumery. Calone, a synthetic ozonic, sea watery smelling molecule discovered by Pfizer in 1966, is used in large quantities in Issey Mayake and occurs in Brown Algae in nature, looks very close to its molecular relative Valium. Luca Turin entertainingly writes about this, in one of his perfume reviews in a Zurich magazine. Perfumery may be giving us homeopathic doses of these molecules and our bodies maybe doing things with them. This could be part of the mystery and allure of perfume.

Glue was a kind of perfume as well. It was a highly dangerous experimental perfume, that allowed interaction with another being in another time and space. It opened up the possibility of knowing a new language – instantly. This being and I experienced a form of empathogenic communication that existed in lines of coded melody. A record of these conversations where housed as zig-zagged golden amber needles, that where twisted into filigree constructions (like a pile of tossed yarrow stalks made of light, that then bent into a tangle of shapes) with tiny offshoot tendrils, forming an intricate open weaved and chaotic blanket hanging in space. A kind of wire-frame architectonics, something I would come to know later as resembling the wire frame sub-structure of 3d models. When the need arose, to recall some aspect of our dialogue, we would simply “draw from a kind of quiver thing” and the melodic phrase would sound and we would simultaneously listen, acknowledge the meaning of the melodic phrase and move on to the next stage of the conversation.

The dialogue no matter how far “out there,” always had the sense that there where levels and tasks to be undertaken. This gave a feeling of order and hierarchy to the situation. I also experienced this “order and hierarchy,” in a very different way in the “machines of delirium” that occurred as a child when affected by bouts of fever during illness. The “regime of power” that existed in that experience was a diabolical form of torture that conjured extreme terror and was anything but an encounter with an em pathogenic being, more like an encounter with “pure evil” and this tells me, we are a multiplicity of beings in a fleshy body. And Spinoza tells us that we are “An infinite number of attributes for any one substance”.

This “angel of the vines” communicated to me in a way that could only be described as completely compelling; an encounter with a powerful spiritual form. Through out my meetings with this unstable poly-morphology there was the constancy of a melodic refrain that functioned as a beacon, as a powerful lure through the blackness that reached out towards desire – desire to be in its aura.

Non organic life form – a gift in fading light. Substance less body into being – no skeletal structure required. You are high octane spirit – catalytic conversion from coal tar earth to “Hydrocarbon Angel”.

Projecting a field of radiance, a sensation permeated that I was meeting with a deeply feminine presence, that is very difficult to put into words. Representational signifiers had collapsed to be replaced by an almost total affective experience. This being, was wider at the base than at the top (figuration)- the perception of defined organs, body parts and structural elements that make up a sensible figure seemed almost redundant. The being was mostly a field of vibrational energy that had become like a living work of modern art albeit, one that exists in the virtual of the hallucination, rather than crossing over into the organic plane of the real.

Where the body is liberated from the things that hold it together;it confirms its extra – dimensionality.

This siren lived in the “smooth deeps” of a dark and unlimited mental void, always waiting just around the corner in a space beyond the terrestrial, inhabiting the celestial and infernal realms.

All the familiar features of flesh and blood had long departed into the outer reaches of time and space, to leave in its wake an afterimage, of what years later would become familiar when I saw the works of Duchamp & Brancusi. The realisation that they gave us the gift of images and objects of human forms, that had crossed the borders of the possible into new non-organic life forms. Always in motion, the idea of a body that surpasses meat and flesh, for one of light and space, a hyper criss-crossing of lines of pure pigment and shiny metal armour interlocking fragments that remained part of the whole. A construction of composites and fragmented crystalline hybrids that ultimately produce the authentic characters of art, in order to open up the possibility for the world of creatures to come; the creatures of anime, the horror film, photography and science fiction.

The work we make is filled to the brim with occulted inhabitations and haunting(s).
I grew up in a house that was said to be filled with spirits. I clearly remember my parents and their friends gathered around the Ouiji board talking to “people from the other side”. I remember the sounds of summer infused with Swedenbourg’s recordings of people speaking from the dead, crackling away on the record player between bursts of the soundtrack from Apocalypse Now, which interestingly for a cinema soundtrack is not just the musical parts, but the dialogue and sound effects as well. I enjoyed the arguments and debates that would take place with family members around the table that was a constant in the days before the internet appeared and colour television arrived making everyone silent. It’s from this background I guess, that a work like “The Door” becomes possible.

The synopsis of the work hinges on the combination of a number of seemingly unlikely events, that bring together the sounds of battle and deep thudding artillery.We hear the distant pulse of a dub reggae rave party with its voodoo call to the libido; poltergeists fly through the space from one speaker to the other. Logging trucks rumble and an opium induced voiceover whispers, recalling the arrival of “earth’s daughter” from the “other side.” She has finally come back to the community of tree dwellers, after ejecting from a time travelling space ship to meet with her boyfriend. Along the way, we learn of a green star that appeared above the horizon that brought great misfortune. We learn of some of the farming practices that take place within this so called “sustainable community,” all of this via the spooky intoxicated mumblings and slurring of some one who is under the influence.It’s a kind of junkie hippy narrative, meets a set from Nicholas Roeg’s “The Man Who Fell to Earth”. Despite all of this, I simply wanted to make a luminous green work.

The characterisation solely takes place within the sound track of the work, making all of these events invisible to the eye, but alive to the ear.I wanted to make a work where the images of the characters appeared in the viewers head, rather than being seen on screen. I wanted the process of characterisation to be internalised, rather than external and I wanted to conjure ghosts. It was like a radio play in a strange and exotic setting. The sounds because of the audio technology of surround sound filled the space 3 dimensionally.

We see a two screen projection of an empty forest glowing in green luminous light. Bugs flitter in the air – the shadows move in the breeze. The forest is filled with sound.

The whole enterprise of cinema art is like a hallucinatory art – the art of assemblage, of sound colour and light that is projected. The computer is a machine that allows one to bring all of these thing together, it’s a kind of factory where a multiplicity of technologies exist, side by side, to produce these remarkable assemblages. When a work is successful, a great variety of elements come together to form a harmony, no matter how far away from each other in type, the elements seem to be. This potential for “difference” and synthesis to co-exist in a work of Art,is at the heart of novelty and for me is one of the most exciting aspects of the process of making art. Its like a new form of gymnastics – to make the body hold itself up in space in some interesting contorted positions, thus far unseen. The same thing then for ideas or materials, to make everything drunken and askew, frozen in time and space – a painting, a leap, a suspended white horse in the sky, a naked women fucks a cloud. (see fig 3.) Artists are human synthesisers.

Perfumery, in its history has paralleled cultural shifts and mood changes in society. It has had its modernity and within that certain styles have emerged that parallel what has occurred within contemporary art. The world of perfume composition is a highly developed field of knowledge and also a highly secretive and exclusive world. Part Art & Design & part organic chemistry as art, its commitment to discover new worlds for the senses through a remarkable compositional process & with an incredible palette of materials & commitment to conceptual ideas around the senses, surely makes this activity both an unofficial artform and a world of exciting future possibilities. Of course context is everything. The art of perfumery has been both strengthened & weakened by the forces of capitalism. There is “functional perfumery” that fills our world with smells and there is “fine fragrance” that manages to escape mass market imperatives.

Sniffing glue certainly “opened the doors of perception” but it is not recommended to anyone. It is a highly dangerous activity regardless of the magical gifts that it brings; it can easily end in tragedy.
fig 3. Jupiter & Io, 1531
Correggio.

Pasted from <http://www.twentyfirstcenturyholograms.blogspot.com/&gt;

Society of Control – Gilles Deleuze

pasted from  http://www.nadir.org/nadir/archiv/netzkritik/societyofcontrol.html

Society of Control
Gilles Deleuze

( I. historical / II. logic / III. program )
I. Historical
Foucault located the disciplinary societies in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; they reach their height at the outset of the twentieth. They initiate the organization of vast spaces of enclosure. The individual never ceases passing from one closed environment to another, each having its own laws: first the family; then the school (“you are no longer in your family”); then the barracks (“you are no longer at school”); then the factory; from time to time the hospital; possibly the prison, the preeminent instance of the enclosed environment. It’s the prison that serves as the analogical model: at the sight of some laborers, the heroine of Rossellini’s Europa ’51 could exclaim, “I thought I was seeing convicts.”

Foucault has brilliantly analyzed the ideal project of these environments of enclosure, particularly visible within the factory: to concentrate; to distribute in space; to order in time; to compose a productive force within the dimension of space-time whose effect will be greater than the sum of its component forces. But what Foucault recognized as well was the transience of this model: it succeeded that of the societies of sovereignty, the goal and functions of which were something quite different (to tax rather than to organize production, to rule on death rather than to administer life); the transition took place over time, and Napoleon seemed to effect the large-scale conversion from one society to the other. But in their turn the disciplines underwent a crisis to the benefit of new forces that were gradually instituted and which accelerated after World War II: a disciplinary society was what we already no longer were, what we had ceased to be.

We are in a generalized crisis in relation to all the environments of enclosure–prison, hospital, factory, school, family. The family is an “interior,” in crisis like all other interiors–scholarly, professional, etc. The administrations in charge never cease announcing supposedly necessary reforms: to reform schools, to reform industries, hospitals, the armed forces, prisons. But everyone knows that these institutions are finished, whatever the length of their expiration periods. It’s only a matter of administering their last rites and of keeping people employed until the installation of the new forces knocking at the door. These are the societies of control, which are in the process of replacing disciplinary societies. “Control” is the name Burroughs proposes as a term for the new monster, one that Foucault recognizes as our immediate future. Paul Virilio also is continually analyzing the ultrarapid forms of free-floating control that replaced the old disciplines operating in the time frame of a closed system. There is no need to invoke the extraordinary pharmaceutical productions, the molecular engineering, the genetic manipulations, although these are slated to enter the new process. There is no need to ask which is the toughest regime, for it’s within each of them that liberating and enslaving forces confront one another. For example, in the crisis of the hospital as environment of enclosure, neighborhood clinics, hospices, and day care could at first express new freedom, but they could participate as well in mechanisms of control that are equal to the harshest of confinements. There is no need to fear or hope, but only to look for new weapons.

II. Logic
The different internments of spaces of enclosure through which the individual passes are independent variables: each time one us supposed to start from zero, and although a common language for all these places exists, it is analogical. One the other hand, the different control mechanisms are inseparable variations, forming a system of variable geometry the language of which is numerical (which doesn’t necessarily mean binary). Enclosures are molds, distinct castings, but controls are a modulation, like a self-deforming cast that will continuously change from one moment to the other, or like a sieve whose mesh will transmute from point to point.

This is obvious in the matter of salaries: the factory was a body that contained its internal forces at the level of equilibrium, the highest possible in terms of production, the lowest possible in terms of wages; but in a society of control, the corporation has replaced the factory, and the corporation is a spirit, a gas. Of course the factory was already familiar with the system of bonuses, but the corporation works more deeply to impose a modulation of each salary, in states of perpetual metastability that operate through challenges, contests, and highly comic group sessions. If the most idiotic television game shows are so successful, it’s because they express the corporate situation with great precision. The factory constituted individuals as a single body to the double advantage of the boss who surveyed each element within the mass and the unions who mobilized a mass resistance; but the corporation constantly presents the brashest rivalry as a healthy form of emulation, an excellent motivational force that opposes individuals against one another and runs through each, dividing each within. The modulating principle of “salary according to merit” has not failed to tempt national education itself. Indeed, just as the corporation replaces the factory, perpetual training tends to replace the school, and continuous control to replace the examination. Which is the surest way of delivering the school over to the corporation.

In the disciplinary societies one was always starting again (from school to the barracks, from the barracks to the factory), while in the societies of control one is never finished with anything–the corporation, the educational system, the armed services being metastable states coexisting in one and the same modulation, like a universal system of deformation. In The Trial, Kafka, who had already placed himself at the pivotal point between two types of social formation, described the most fearsome of judicial forms. The apparent acquittal of the disciplinary societies (between two incarcerations); and the limitless postponements of the societies of control (in continuous variation) are two very different modes of juridicial life, and if our law is hesitant, itself in crisis, it’s because we are leaving one in order to enter the other. The disciplinary societies have two poles: the signature that designates the individual, and the number or administrative numeration that indicates his or her position within a mass. This is because the disciplines never saw any incompatibility between these two, and because at the same time power individualizes and masses together, that is, constitutes those over whom it exercises power into a body and molds the individuality of each member of that body. (Foucault saw the origin of this double charge in the pastoral power of the priest–the flock and each of its animals–but civil power moves in turn and by other means to make itself lay “priest.”) In the societies of control, on the other hand, what is important is no longer either a signature or a number, but a code: the code is a password, while on the other hand disciplinary societies are regulated by watchwords (as much from the point of view of integration as from that of resistance). The numerical language of control is made of codes that mark access to information, or reject it. We no longer find ourselves dealing with the mass/individual pair. Individuals have become “dividuals,” and masses, samples, data, markets, or “banks.” Perhaps it is money that expresses the distinction between the two societies best, since discipline always referred back to minted money that locks gold as numerical standard, while control relates to floating rates of exchange, modulated according to a rate established by a set of standard currencies. The old monetary mole is the animal of the space of enclosure, but the serpent is that of the societies of control. We have passed from one animal to the other, from the mole to the serpent, in the system under which we live, but also in our manner of living and in our relations with others. The disciplinary man was a discontinuous producer of energy, but the man of control is undulatory, in orbit, in a continuous network. Everywhere surfing has already replaced the older sports.

Types of machines are easily matched with each type of society–not that machines are determining, but because they express those social forms capable of generating them and using them. The old societies of sovereignty made use of simple machines–levers, pulleys, clocks; but the recent disciplinary societies equipped themselves with machines involving energy, with the passive danger of entropy and the active danger of sabotage; the societies of control operate with machines of a third type, computers, whose passive danger is jamming and whose active one is piracy or the introduction of viruses. This technological evolution must be, even more profoundly, a mutation of capitalism, an already well-known or familiar mutation that can be summed up as follows: nineteenth-century capitalism is a capitalism of concentration, for production and for property. It therefore erects a factory as a space of enclosure, the capitalist being the owner of the means of production but also, progressively, the owner of other spaces conceived through analogy (the worker’s familial house, the school). As for markets, they are conquered sometimes by specialization, sometimes by colonization, sometimes by lowering the costs of production. But in the present situation, capitalism is no longer involved in production, which it often relegates to the Third World, even for the complex forms of textiles, metallurgy, or oil production. It’s a capitalism of higher-order production. It no-longer buys raw materials and no longer sells the finished products: it buys the finished products or assembles parts. What it wants to sell is services but what it wants to buy is stocks. This is no longer a capitalism for production but for the product, which is to say, for being sold or marketed. Thus is essentially dispersive, and the factory has given way to the corporation. The family, the school, the army, the factory are no longer the distinct analogical spaces that converge towards an owner–state or private power–but coded figures–deformable and transformable–of a single corporation that now has only stockholders. Even art has left the spaces of enclosure in order to enter into the open circuits of the bank. The conquests of the market are made by grabbing control and no longer by disciplinary training, by fixing the exchange rate much more than by lowering costs, by transformation of the product more than by specialization of production. Corruption thereby gains a new power. Marketing has become the center or the “soul” of the corporation. We are taught that corporations have a soul, which is the most terrifying news in the world. The operation of markets is now the instrument of social control and forms the impudent breed of our masters. Control is short-term and of rapid rates of turnover, but also continuous and without limit, while discipline was of long duration, infinite and discontinuous. Man is no longer man enclosed, but man in debt. It is true that capitalism has retained as a constant the extreme poverty of three-quarters of humanity, too poor for debt, too numerous for confinement: control will not only have to deal with erosions of frontiers but with the explosions within shanty towns or ghettos.

III. Program
The conception of a control mechanism, giving the position of any element within an open environment at any given instant (whether animal in a reserve or human in a corporation, as with an electronic collar), is not necessarily one of science fiction. Felix Guattari has imagined a city where one would be able to leave one’s apartment, one’s street, one’s neighborhood, thanks to one’s (dividual) electronic card that raises a given barrier; but the card could just as easily be rejected on a given day or between certain hours; what counts is not the barrier but the computer that tracks each person’s position–licit or illicit–and effects a universal modulation.

The socio-technological study of the mechanisms of control, grasped at their inception, would have to be categorical and to describe what is already in the process of substitution for the disciplinary sites of enclosure, whose crisis is everywhere proclaimed. It may be that older methods, borrowed from the former societies of sovereignty, will return to the fore, but with the necessary modifications. What counts is that we are at the beginning of something. In the prison system: the attempt to find penalties of “substitution,” at least for petty crimes, and the use of electronic collars that force the convicted person to stay at home during certain hours. For the school system: continuous forms of control, and the effect on the school of perpetual training, the corresponding abandonment of all university research, the introduction of the “corporation” at all levels of schooling. For the hospital system: the new medicine “without doctor or patient” that singles out potential sick people and subjects at risk, which in no way attests to individuation–as they say–but substitutes for the individual or numerical body the code of a “dividual” material to be controlled. In the corporate system: new ways of handling money, profits, and humans that no longer pass through the old factory form. These are very small examples, but ones that will allow for better understanding of what is meant by the crisis of the institutions, which is to say, the progressive and dispersed installation of a new system of domination. One of the most important questions will concern the ineptitude of the unions: tied to the whole of their history of struggle against the disciplines or within the spaces of enclosure, will they be able to adapt themselves or will they give way to new forms of resistance against the societies of control? Can we already grasp the rough outlines of the coming forms, capable of threatening the joys of marketing? Many young people strangely boast of being “motivated”; they re-request apprenticeships and permanent training. It’s up to them to discover what they’re being made to serve, just as their elders discovered, not without difficulty, the telos of the disciplines. The coils of a serpent are even more complex that the burrows of a molehill.

L’autre journal, Nr. I, Mai 1990.

( top / I. historik / II. logik / III. programm )

Masters Course Work TBA and Photomedia Honors links from last weeks talks

Essence overview from Wiki

A list of early photographic methods including Bromoil

An excellent overview on Deleuze from the Internet encyclopedia of philosphy

A  wonderful site that transcribes a candid encounter with Deleuze

Ansel Adams was mentioned heres a link

Sublime (overview) from Wiki

Occult photography ( short article)

An exhibition of spirit photography

From Becs talk the week before we talked a a bit about expressionism versus abstraction and Plato was mentioned in this long wiki entry see the section on Metaphysics Also see the section on metaphysics in the link on the sublime above.

Here is the wiki entry for a famous book that is worth reading like a hummingbird pecks at things